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Borderline personality disorder and childhood trauma: Exploring the affected biological systems and mechanisms

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dc.contributor.author Cattane, N., Rossi, R., Lanfredi, M., & Cattaneo, A.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-06T18:23:15Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-06T18:23:15Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Cattane, N., Rossi, R., Lanfredi, M., & Cattaneo, A. (2017). Borderline personality disorder and childhood trauma: Exploring the affected biological systems and mechanisms. BMC Psychiatry, 17, 221. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5472954/pdf/12888_2017_Article_1383.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3419
dc.description.abstract Background: According to several studies, the onset of the Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) depends on the combination between genetic and environmental factors (GxE), in particular between biological vulnerabilities and the exposure to traumatic experiences during childhood. We have searched for studies reporting possible alterations in several biological processes and brain morphological features in relation to childhood trauma experiences and to BPD. We have also looked for epigenetic mechanisms as they could be mediators of the effects of childhood trauma in BPD vulnerability. Discussion: We prove the role of alterations in Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis, in neurotrasmission, in the endogenous opioid system and in neuroplasticity in the childhood trauma-associated vulnerability to develop BPD; we also confirm the presence of morphological changes in several BPD brain areas and in particular in those involved in stress response. Summary: Not so many studies are available on epigenetic changes in BPD patients, although these mechanisms are widely investigated in relation to stress-related disorders. A better comprehension of the biological and epigenetic mechanisms, affected by childhood trauma and altered in BPD patients, could allow to identify “at high risk” subjects and to prevent or minimize the development of the disease later in life. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BMC Psychiatry en_US
dc.subject Borderline personality disorder en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject childhood trauma en_US
dc.subject HPA axis en_US
dc.subject Endogenous opioid system en_US
dc.subject Neurotransmission en_US
dc.subject Neuroplasticity en_US
dc.subject Neuroimaging studies en_US
dc.subject Epigenetic mechanisms en_US
dc.title Borderline personality disorder and childhood trauma: Exploring the affected biological systems and mechanisms en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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