CALiO Search

Abusive Head Trauma: Recognition, Response and Prevention

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Otterman, G., & Palusci, V. J.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-03T17:20:53Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-03T17:20:53Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Otterman, G., & Palusci, V. J. (2020). Abusive head trauma: recognition, response and prevention. Child abuse review, 29(3), 171-181. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdfdirect/10.1002/car.2640
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/5075
dc.description.abstract Abusive head trauma (AHT), with its subset diagnosis shaken baby syndrome, has attracted professional interest for centuries (Caffey, 1972, 1974; Guthkelch, 1971; Helfer and Kempe, 1968; Tardieu, 1860). In the 21st century, with contributions from a transdisciplinary international corps of scholars and clinicians, the body of science has developed further as multiple lines of accumulated evidence have expanded our understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes and prevention (Choudhary et al., 2018; Kemp et al., 2011; Lazoritz and Palusci, 2001; Maguire et al., 2013; Narang et al., 2016, 2020; Rauth-Farley et al., 2006). Undertaking research on AHT presents a distinct set of challenges as its diagnosis and management call for a complex multidisciplinary process that requires interagency collaboration. Cross-national comparisons are thereby difficult, as societies vary in organisational models of paediatric care (Otterman et al., 2017). Additionally, a cadre of medical professionals has challenged the diagnosis in courts of law in many countries in an effort to sow doubt and deny the validity of the diagnosis (Chadwick and Krous, 1997; Leventhal and Edwards, 2017). As guest editors for this special issue of Child Abuse Review, we are delighted to present articles about AHT that highlight a number of international perspectives which we believe will be of considerable value to researchers and clinicians. These papers address aspects ranging from epidemiology and clinical impact to aetiology and diagnosis, and prevention. They engage with the voices of practitioners and children themselves with service data, all of which help to inform our understanding of AHT and to build the evidence base for the interventions that challenge and respond to it. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Child Abuse Review en_US
dc.subject shaken baby syndrome en_US
dc.subject abusive head trauma en_US
dc.subject editorial en_US
dc.subject Epidemiology en_US
dc.title Abusive Head Trauma: Recognition, Response and Prevention en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account