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Violence against children and adolescents by nursing staff: prevalence rates and implications for practice

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dc.contributor.author Hoffmann, U., Clemens, V., König, E., Brähler, E., & Fegert, J. M.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-17T15:31:57Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-17T15:31:57Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Hoffmann, U., Clemens, V., König, E., Brähler, E., & Fegert, J. M. (2020). Violence against children and adolescents by nursing staff: prevalence rates and implications for practice. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 14(1), 1-12. (2020). Violence against children and adolescents by nursing staff: prevalence rates and implications for practice. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 14(1), 1-12. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s13034-020-00350-6
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/4919
dc.description.abstract International studies show that child maltreatment is a widespread but often underestimated problem that causes high individual, social and economic costs. Child maltreatment is an important topic for the medical sector as well. On the one hand, affected persons often seek support and help from healthcare professionals, but on the other hand, assaults can also occur in medical institutions by healthcare professionals. Surprisingly, there is hardly any data on the frequency of child maltreatment by healthcare professionals in general and particularly by nursing staff. Methods Therefore, in a large representative survey of the German population of 2,516 subjects aged between 14 and 91, the experience of child maltreatment in medical institutions by nursing staff was assessed retrospectively. Results Of the 46 subjects who had an inpatient stay in a child and adolescent psychiatry before the age of 18, 33.3% reported to have experienced maltreatment by nursing staff, while 17.3% of the 474 persons who had an inpatient stay in general or pediatric hospitals experienced maltreatment by nursing staff. All forms of maltreatment were significantly more frequent in psychiatric compared to general and pediatric hospitals. Conclusions The results of our representative retrospective survey demonstrate that maltreatment by nursing staff are not rare individual cases, but that medical facilities bear systemic risks for assault. Therefore, it is necessary that all medical institutions, in particular psychiatric hospitals, address this issue. In order to reduce the risk for assaults, it is important not only to implement structural measures but also to develop an attitude that emphasizes zero tolerance for violence against children and adolescents. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject violence en_US
dc.subject Germany en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.subject International Resources en_US
dc.subject healthcare en_US
dc.subject child maltreatment en_US
dc.title Violence against children and adolescents by nursing staff: prevalence rates and implications for practice en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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