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Oxytocin receptor genetic and epigenetic variation: association with child abuse and adult psychiatric symptoms

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dc.contributor.author Smearman, E. L., Almli, L. M., Conneely, K. N., Brody, G. H., Sales, J. M., Bradley, B., ... & Smith, A. K.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-18T16:26:46Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-18T16:26:46Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Smearman, E. L., Almli, L. M., Conneely, K. N., Brody, G. H., Sales, J. M., Bradley, B., ... & Smith, A. K. (2016). Oxytocin receptor genetic and epigenetic variations: Association with child abuse and adult psychiatric symptoms. Child development, 87(1), 122-134. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4733885/pdf/nihms744590.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3299
dc.description.abstract Childhood abuse can alter biological systems and increase risk for adult psychopathology. Epigenetic mechanisms, alterations in DNA structure that regulate the gene expression, are a potential mechanism underlying this risk. While abuse associates with methylation of certain genes, particularly those in the stress response system, no study to date has evaluated abuse and methylation of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR). However, studies support a role for OXTR in the link between abuse and adverse adult outcomes, showing that abuse can confer greater risk for psychiatric symptoms in those with specific OXTR genotypes. Our study therefore sought to (1) assess the role of epigenetics in the link between abuse and psychopathology and (2) to begin to integrate the genetic and epigenetic literature by exploring associations between OXTR genotypes and DNA CpG methylation. Data on 18 OXTR CpG sites, 44 SNPs, childhood abuse, and adult depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed in 393 African American adults (age = 41±12.8). Overall, 68% of genotypes associated with methylation of nearby CpG sites, with a subset surviving multiple test correction. Child abuse associated with higher methylation of two CpG sites yet did not survive correction or serve as a mediator of psychopathology. However, abuse interacted with CpG methylation to predict psychopathology. These findings suggest a role for OXTR in understanding the influence of early environments on adult psychiatric symptoms. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Child Development en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject psychological effects en_US
dc.subject gene-environment interactions en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Oxytocin receptor genetic and epigenetic variation: association with child abuse and adult psychiatric symptoms en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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