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Parent gender as a moderator: The relationships between social support, collective efficacy, and child physical abuse in a community sample

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dc.contributor.author Wolf, J. P.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-26T14:36:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-26T14:36:22Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Wolf, J. P. (2015). Parent gender as a moderator: The relationships between social support, collective efficacy, and child physical abuse in a community sample. Child maltreatment, 20(2), 125-135. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4599369/pdf/nihms726427.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3186
dc.description.abstract Social support and collective efficacy are related to child physical abuse. However, little is known about whether these relationships differ for women and men, although mothers and fathers differ in the quantity and quality of time spent with children. This study examined whether the relationship between social support, collective efficacy, and physical abuse is stronger for mothers than fathers. Telephone interviews were conducted with parent respondents in 50 California cities (n=3,023). Data were analyzed via overdispersed multilevel Poisson models. Results suggest that high levels of emotional support were inversely associated with physical abuse for women and men, although this effect was stronger for women. High levels of companionship support were positively associated with physical abuse for women; however the opposite was true for men. There were no significant interactions between collective efficacy variables and gender. The relationships between some types of social support and physical abuse appear to vary for men and women suggesting possibilities for more targeted intervention. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Child Maltreatment en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject risk factors en_US
dc.subject parenting en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Parent gender as a moderator: The relationships between social support, collective efficacy, and child physical abuse in a community sample en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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