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Spanking by Parents and Subsequent Antisocial Behavior of Children

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dc.contributor.author Straus, M. A., Sugarman, D. B., & Giles-Sims, J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-23T15:02:01Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-23T15:02:01Z
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier.citation Straus, M. A., Sugarman, D. B., & Giles-Sims, J. (1997). Spanking by parents and subsequent antisocial behavior of children. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 151(8), 761-767. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://healingreligion.com/2490/html/CP24.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3149
dc.description.abstract Objective: To deal with the causal relationship between corporal punishment and antisocial behavior (ASB) by considering the level of ASB of the child at the start of the study. Methods: Data from interviews with a national sample of 807 mothers of children aged 6 to 9 years in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement. Analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis that when parents use corporal punishment to correct ASB, it increases subsequent ASB. The analysis controlled for the level of ASB at the start of the study, family socioeconomic status, sex of the child, and the extent to which the home provided emotional support and cognitive stimulation. Results: Forty-four percent of the mothers reported spanking their children during the week prior to the study and they spanked them an average of 2.1 times that week. The more spanking at the start of the period, the higher the level of ASB 2 years later. The change is unlikely to be owing to the child's tendency toward ASB or to confounding with demographic characteristics or with parental deficiency in other key aspects of socialization because those variables were statistically controlled. Conclusions: When parents use corporal punishment to reduce ASB, the long-term effect tends to be the opposite. The findings suggest that if parents replace corporal punishment by nonviolent modes of discipline, it could reduce the risk of ASB among children and reduce the level of violence in American society. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject physical abuse en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject behavioral effects en_US
dc.subject risk factors en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Spanking by Parents and Subsequent Antisocial Behavior of Children en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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