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Support Person Presence and Child Victim Testimony: Believe it or Not

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dc.contributor.author McAuliff, B. D., Lapin, J., & Michel, S.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-27T20:57:43Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-27T20:57:43Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation McAuliff, B. D., Lapin, J., & Michel, S. (2015). Support person presence and child victim testimony: believe it or not. Behavioral sciences & the law, 33(4), 508-527. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bradley_Mcauliff2/publication/281167771_Support_Person_Presence_and_Child_Victim_Testimony_Believe_it_or_Not/links/55e0c01b08ae2fac471ca922.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/2712
dc.description.abstract This study examined the effects of support person presence on participants’ perceptions of an alleged child sexual abuse victim and defendant. Two hundred jury-eligible community members (n = 100 males) viewed a DVD of an 11-year-old girl's simulated courtroom testimony either with or without a female support person seated next to her. Participants found the child victim to be less accurate and trustworthy, and the defendant to be less guilty and less likely to have sexually abused children, when the support person was present. Participants who viewed the female support person (n = 100) believed that she had probably coached and spent a great deal of time with the child victim before testifying. Female participants perceived the child to be more accurate, and the defendant to be more guilty and likely to have sexually abused children, than male participants. The degree to which the child victim's testimonial behavior violated participants’ expectancies mediated the negative relation between support person presence and child victim accuracy and trustworthiness. Support person presence was positively associated with expectancy violation, which in turn was negatively associated with child victim accuracy and trustworthiness. These preliminary findings suggest that seating a support person next to an alleged child victim in court may have the unintended effect of decreasing the child's perceived credibility and, if replicated, suggest that alternative seating arrangements might be necessary. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Behavioral sciences & the law en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject court en_US
dc.subject believability en_US
dc.subject truthfulness en_US
dc.subject jury en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Support Person Presence and Child Victim Testimony: Believe it or Not en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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