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Neuropsychological Findings in Childhood Neglect and their Relationships to Pediatric PTSD

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dc.contributor.author De Bellis, M. D., Hooper, S. R., Spratt, E. G., & Woolley, D. P.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-06-24T16:20:24Z
dc.date.available 2014-06-24T16:20:24Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation De Bellis, M. D., Hooper, S. R., Spratt, E. G., & Woolley, D. P. (2009). Neuropsychological findings in childhood neglect and their relationships to pediatric PTSD. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 15(06), 868-878. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3036972/pdf/nihms266183.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/1513
dc.description.abstract Statement of the problem: Although child neglect is the most prevalent form of child maltreatment, the neurocognitive effects of neglect is understudied. Methods: We examined IQ, reading, mathematics, and neurocognitive domains of fine-motor skills, language, visual-spatial, memory/learning, and attention/executive functions in two groups of non-sexually abused medically healthy neglected children, one with DSM-IV posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and one without, and a demographically similar healthy non-maltreated control group. Key findings: Significantly lower IQ, reading, mathematics, and selected differences in complex visual attention, visual memory, language, verbal memory and learning, planning, problem solving, and speeded naming were seen in Neglect Groups. The Neglect with PTSD Group performed worse than controls on NEPSY Design Copying, NEPSY Tower, and Mathematics; and performed worse than controls and Neglect without PTSD on NEPSY Memory for Faces-Delayed. Negative correlations were seen between PTSD symptoms, PTSD severity, and maltreatment variables, and IQ, Academic Achievement, and neurocognitive domains. Conclusions: Neglected children demonstrated significantly lower neurocognitive outcomes and academic achievement than controls. Lower IQ, neurocognitive functions, and achievement may be associated with more PTSD symptoms (particularly re-experiencing symptoms), greater PTSD severity, and a greater number of maltreatment experiences. Trauma experiences may additionally contribute to subsequent neurodevelopmental risk in neglected children. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject neglect en_US
dc.subject neurocognitive functioning en_US
dc.subject cognitive functioning en_US
dc.subject academic achievement en_US
dc.subject attention en_US
dc.subject memory en_US
dc.subject IQ en_US
dc.subject executive function en_US
dc.subject neuropsychological tests en_US
dc.subject trauma en_US
dc.subject posttraumatic stress en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Neuropsychological Findings in Childhood Neglect and their Relationships to Pediatric PTSD en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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