CALiO Search

Bullying in a Networked Era: A Literature Review

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Levy, Nathaniel ; Cortesi, Sandra Clio ; Gasser, Urs ; Crowley, Edward ; Beaton, Meredith ; Casey, June A. ; Nolan, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-23T15:56:13Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-23T15:56:13Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Levy, Nathaniel ; Cortesi, Sandra Clio ; Gasser, Urs ; Crowley, Edward ; Beaton, Meredith ; Casey, June A. ; Nolan, Caroline. (2012). Bullying in a Networked Era: A Literature Review. Harvard University, Berkman Center Research Publication No. 2012-17. 62 p. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.a51.nl/sites/default/files/pdf/SSRN_id21468771.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/4935
dc.description.abstract This research update presents an aggregation and summary of recent academic literature on youth bullying. The purpose of this document is to “translate” scholarly research for a concerned public audience, which may include but is not limited to parents, caregivers, educators, and practitioners. This translation highlights recent findings and developments in the literature and makes them accessible to the informed but non-expert reader. The document’s two guiding questions are “What is bullying?” (Section I) and “What can be done about bullying?” (Section II). Section I begins with a brief overview of key definitions and related research conversations and then addresses bullying’s prevalence, the types of individuals involved in bullying, the characteristics of individuals involved and the consequences of their involvement, and community-level dynamics related to bullying. Section II covers four areas where action has been taken to address problems associated with bullying – school policy, curricula, school climate, and parents – and ends on a note about approaches that mix or cut across these areas. The purpose is to render lessons learned from research and assessment accessible to those interested in deepening or expanding their knowledge of bullying-related issues.… [T]he distinct focus on bullying in this document offers fresh perspective on a term that has captured much public attention and the ways the term has informed and guided action. The review process focused on studies published between 2008 and 2012 but also included some earlier, influential studies. It also focused primarily on U.S.-based data and young people from around the ages of American middle school to high school. However, some international data are included from certain notable studies, especially those that address narrower subtopics or notably contribute to theoretical or conceptual conversations. The document’s scope is multi-disciplinary, drawing mainly from child and developmental psychology, education, criminology, public health, pediatrics, and Internet studies. With translation as the goal, the review sought to first establish common reference points among different bodies of research, using primary studies along with meta-analyses that aggregate and analyze other research findings to address large-scale or generalizable trends. At times, especially when comparing research definitions or changes in the field over time, the review draws on reviews or book chapters to provide summaries of themes and definitions. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Harvard University en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject coercion en_US
dc.subject psychological abuse en_US
dc.subject emotional abuse en_US
dc.subject adolescents en_US
dc.subject teens en_US
dc.subject youth en_US
dc.title Bullying in a Networked Era: A Literature Review en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account