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Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence

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dc.contributor.author Naughton, Catherine M. ; O’Donnell, Aisling T. ; Muldoon, Orla T.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-30T17:03:39Z
dc.date.available 2018-10-30T17:03:39Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Naughton, Catherine M. ; O’Donnell, Aisling T. ; Muldoon, Orla T. (2015). Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence. Frontiers in psychology, 6, 1249-1257. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01249/pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/4015
dc.description.abstract Exposure to parental intimate partner violence (parental IPV) is a complex trauma. Research within social psychology establishes that identification with social groups impacts positively on how we appraise, respond to and recover from traumatic events. IPV is also a highly stigmatized social phenomenon and social isolation is a major factor for families affected by IPV, yet strong identification with the family group may act as a beneficial psychological resource to young people who grew up in homes affected by IPV. The current study, an online survey of 355 students (Mage = 20, 70% female), investigated if a psychosocial process, specifically identification with the family, may influence the relationship between the predictor, exposure to parental IPV, and outcomes, global self-esteem and state anxiety. Mediation analysis suggests that identification with the family has a positive influence on the relationship between exposure to parental IPV and psychological outcomes; exposure to parental IPV results in reduced family identification, but when family identification is strong it results in both reduced anxiety and increased self-esteem for young people. The findings highlight the importance of having a strong sense of belonging to the extended family for young people who were exposed to parental IPV, thus has implications for prevention, intervention, and social policy. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers in Psychology en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject child witness en_US
dc.subject domestic violence en_US
dc.subject family violence en_US
dc.subject psychological effects en_US
dc.subject adolescents en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.subject International Resources en_US
dc.subject Ireland en_US
dc.title Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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