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Improving Child Welfare Outcomes Balancing Investments in Prevention and Treatment

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dc.contributor.author Ringel, J. S., Schultz, D., Mendelsohn, J., Holliday, S. B., Sieck, K., Edochie, I., & Davis, L.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-29T17:42:08Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-29T17:42:08Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Ringel, J. S., Schultz, D., Mendelsohn, J., Holliday, S. B., Sieck, K., Edochie, I., & Davis, L. (2018). Improving child welfare outcomes: balancing investments in prevention and treatment. Rand health quarterly, 7(4). en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6075810/
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3937
dc.description.abstract To provide objective analyses about the effects of prevention and treatment programs on child welfare outcomes, RAND researchers built a quantitative model that simulated how children enter and flow through the nation's child welfare system. They then used the model to project how different policy options (preventive services, family preservation treatment efforts, kinship care treatment efforts, and a policy package that combined preventive services and kinship care) would affect a child's pathway through the system, costs, and outcomes in early adulthood. This study is the first attempt to integrate maltreatment risk, detection, pathways through the system, and consequences in a comprehensive quantitative model that can be used to simulate the impact of policy changes. This research suggests that expanding both prevention and treatment is needed to achieve the desired policy objectives: Combining options that intervene at different points in the system and increasing both prevention and treatment generates stronger effects than would any single option. The simulation model identifies ways to increase both targeted prevention and treatment while achieving multiple objectives: reducing maltreatment and the number of children entering the system, improving a child's experience moving through the system, and improving outcomes in young adulthood. These objectives can all be met while also reducing total child welfare system costs. A policy package combining expanded prevention and kinship supports pays for itself: There is a net cost reduction in the range of 3 to 7 percent of total spending (or approximately $5.2 billion to $10.5 billion saved against the current baseline of $155.9 billion) for a cohort of children born over a five-year period. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Rand health quarterly en_US
dc.subject child welfare en_US
dc.subject prevention programs en_US
dc.subject treatment en_US
dc.subject family preservation en_US
dc.title Improving Child Welfare Outcomes Balancing Investments in Prevention and Treatment en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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