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Prenatal substance exposure diagnosed at birth and infant involvement with child protective services

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dc.contributor.author Prindle, John J., Hammond, Ivy, & Putnam-Hornstein, Emily.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-01-23T14:44:46Z
dc.date.available 2018-01-23T14:44:46Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Prindle, John J., Hammond, Ivy, & Putnam-Hornstein, Emily. (2018). Prenatal substance exposure diagnosed at birth and infant involvement with child protective services. Child Abuse & Neglect, 76, 75-83. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.datanetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/Prenatal-substance-exposure-diagnosed-at-birth-and-infant-involvement-with-child-protective-services.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3684
dc.description.abstract Infants have the highest rates of maltreatment reporting and entries to foster care. Prenatal substance exposure is thought to contribute to early involvement with child protective services (CPS), yet there have been limited data with which to examine this relationship or variations by substance type. Using linked birth, hospital discharge, and CPS records from California, we estimated the population prevalence of medically diagnosed substance exposure and neonatal withdrawal disorders at birth. We then explored the corresponding rates of CPS involvement during the first year of life by substance type after adjusting for sociodemographic and health factors. Among 551,232 infants born alive in 2006, 1.45% (n = 7994) were diagnosed with prenatal substance exposure at birth; 61.2% of those diagnosed were reported to CPS before age 1 and nearly one third (29.9%) were placed in foster care. Medically diagnosed prenatal substance exposure was strongly associated with an infant’s likelihood of being reported to CPS, yet significant variation in the likelihood and level of CPS involvement was observed by substance type. Although these data undoubtedly understate the prevalence of prenatal illicit drug and alcohol use, this study provides a population-based characterization of a common pathway to CPS involvement during infancy. Future research is needed to explicate the longer-term trajectories of infants diagnosed with prenatal substance exposure, including the role of CPS. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Child Abuse & Neglect en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject risk factors en_US
dc.subject amphetamines en_US
dc.subject cannabis en_US
dc.subject cocaine en_US
dc.subject opioids en_US
dc.subject parenting en_US
dc.subject mothers en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Prenatal substance exposure diagnosed at birth and infant involvement with child protective services en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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