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Overcoming Biased Views of Gender and Victimhood in Custody Evaluations When Domestic Violence Is Alleged

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dc.contributor.author Perrin, R. L.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-07T17:03:01Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-07T17:03:01Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Perrin, R. L. (2017). Overcoming Biased Views of Gender and Victimhood in Custody Evaluations When Domestic Violence Is Alleged. American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law, 25, 155. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/domestic_violence1/writing_competition_winners_cdsv/WritingComp2015/Perrin%20Ruth.authcheckdam.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3650
dc.description.abstract Divorce can be a dangerous process for victims of domestic violence. Violence and control do not always end when a relationship ends; an abuser, in response to losing control of his victim, may harass his former partner as an attempt to reassert control. Custody evaluations are a tool used in disputed custody cases in which a third party evaluator assists the court by assessing various factors relevant to custody decisions. While multiple researchers have found that domestic violence allegations are very common in disputed custody cases, only one state, California, mandates that its custody evaluators undergo domestic violence training. Despite the obvious necessity, forty-nine states do not legally require that evaluators have knowledge of domestic violence and its impact on victims and children. Research also shows that evaluators with inadequate domestic violence knowledge tend to recommend unsafe parenting plans for domestic violence victims and their children. Part I of this paper discusses research indicating that the unpredictability and lack of safety in recommendations can be traced to varying amounts of knowledge held by evaluators, as well as their beliefs about domestic violence. Part II argues that these beliefs are the result of implicit gender bias and bias against victims. Part III proposes strategies for custody evaluators to overcome these biases. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject exposure to violence en_US
dc.subject child witness to interpersonal violence en_US
dc.subject law en_US
dc.subject family violence en_US
dc.subject jurisprudence en_US
dc.subject review en_US
dc.title Overcoming Biased Views of Gender and Victimhood in Custody Evaluations When Domestic Violence Is Alleged en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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