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Effects of Child Abuse, Adolescent Violence, Peer Approval, and Pro-Violence Attitudes on Intimate Partner Violence in Adulthood

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dc.contributor.author Herrenkohl, Todd I. & Jung, Hyunzee
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-08T16:49:41Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-08T16:49:41Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Herrenkohl, Todd I., & Jung, Hyunzee. (2016), Effects of Child Abuse, Adolescent Violence, Peer Approval, and Pro-Violence Attitudes on Intimate Partner Violence in Adulthood. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 26(4), 304–314. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5549554/pdf/nihms888456.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3600
dc.description.abstract Background: Children’s exposure to violence increases their risk for later victimization and perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV). However, the relative influence of child abuse, adolescent violence, peer approval of violence, and pro-violence attitudes on later intimate partner violence is not well established. Aims: Analyses focus on the prediction of adult IPV from variables measured in childhood and adolescence to establish the unique influence of earlier victimization and perpetration of violence, as well as other variables grounded in theory and empirical findings. Methods: Data are from a longitudinal study that began in the 1970s with a sample of 457 preschool-aged children who were reassessed as adults. Outcomes of adult IPV victimization and perpetration types were regressed on predictors of parent-reported child abuse, officially recorded child maltreatment, adolescent victimization, violence perpetration, pro-violence attitudes, and peer approval of violence during adolescence, controlling for childhood SES, age in adolescence, and gender. Results: Dating violence victimization and peer approval of dating violence in adolescence emerged as the unique predictors of IPV victimization and perpetration in adulthood. Official child maltreatment predicted IPV perpetration. Conclusions: Results underscore the importance of prevention programs and strategies to disrupt the cycle of violence at its early stages, as well as interventions during adolescence targeting peer influences. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject spouse abuse en_US
dc.subject risk factors en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Effects of Child Abuse, Adolescent Violence, Peer Approval, and Pro-Violence Attitudes on Intimate Partner Violence in Adulthood en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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