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Linkages Between Child Abuse and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Girls: Behavioral and Social Correlates

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dc.contributor.author Briscoe-Smith, A. M., & Hinshaw, S. P.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-02T15:48:43Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-02T15:48:43Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Briscoe-Smith, A. M., & Hinshaw, S. P. (2006). Linkages between child abuse and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in girls: Behavioral and social correlates. Child abuse & neglect, 30(11), 1239-1255. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1934403/pdf/nihms-14814.pdf  
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3366
dc.description.abstract Objective: The objectives of this study were to examine whether girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk of having histories of abuse and to assess whether the presence of an abuse history may constitute a distinct subgroup of youth with ADHD. Method: We examined rates and correlates of child abuse in an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 140) and a matched comparison sample of girls without ADHD (n = 88), all aged 6-12 years. A thorough chart review reliably established documented rates of physical and sexual abuse in both samples. Results: There were significantly higher rates of abuse for girls with ADHD (14.3%) than for the comparison sample (4.5%), with most of the abuse found in girls with the Combined as opposed to the Inattentive type. Higher rates of externalizing behaviors (including objective observations in a research summer camp) and peer rejection (indexed through peer sociometric nominations) characterized the subgroup of girls with ADHD with abuse histories compared to the subgroup without such histories, with moderate to large effect sizes. Subgroup differences regarding internalizing problems and cognitive deficits did not emerge. Findings regarding peer rejection were explained, in part, by higher rates of observed aggressive behavior in the abused subgroup. Conclusions: The findings raise important questions about the possible etiologic and/or exacerbating role of abusive trauma in a subgroup of children with ADHD. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Child Abuse & Neglect en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject risk factors en_US
dc.subject race en_US
dc.subject demographics en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Linkages Between Child Abuse and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Girls: Behavioral and Social Correlates en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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