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An Epidemiologic Study of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Adult Sleep Disturbances

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dc.contributor.author Lind, M. J., Aggen, S. H., Kendler, K. S., York, T. P., & Amstadter, A. B.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-18T16:16:14Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-18T16:16:14Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Lind, M. J., Aggen, S. H., Kendler, K. S., York, T. P., & Amstadter, A. B. (2016). An epidemiologic study of childhood sexual abuse and adult sleep disturbances. Psychological trauma: theory, research, practice, and policy, 8(2), 198. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5361883/pdf/nihms712602.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3297
dc.description.abstract Objective: Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is linked to negative consequences, including insomnia. Few studies have examined enduring effects of CSA on adult insomnia. Given the relationship between sleep and poor health, a better understanding of these effects has clinical implications. Method: We used a representative sample of adult twins. Both men and women were assessed with a broad variable representative of CSA, while a subset of females (n=424) were given additional items that captured escalating physical contact and abuse characteristics. A sum score of past month insomnia symptoms was calculated from the shortened version of the SCL-90. Logistic regression was used to estimate the effects of CSA on insomnia symptoms, as well as the effects of physical contact and incident characteristics. Results: Of the full sample (n=8184), 9.8% reported broad CSA. CSA significantly predicted insomnia symptoms in the female sample (n=1407) (OR=1.67, 95% CI=1.35–2.06, p<0.0001). The continuum of physical contact did not predict sleep. On a univariate level, more than one perpetrator and feeling forced/threatened increased risk for sleep problems, while having a male perpetrator (vs. female or multiple perpetrators) decreased risk. These associations did not hold at a multivariate level. In the mixed-sex sample (n=6777), we replicated our CSA finding (OR=1.65, 95% CI=1.34–2.03, p<0.0001) and found that female gender (OR=1.16, 95% CI=1.03–1.30, p=0.0125) was significant. However, the female gender*CSA interaction was not significant. Conclusion: CSA predicts insomnia symptoms in adults 25–30 years post-abuse, but the small sample size for incident characteristics (n=424) resulted in limited conclusions about associated risk. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Psychological trauma: Theory, research, practice, and policy en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject psychological effects en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title An Epidemiologic Study of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Adult Sleep Disturbances en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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