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Victimization, polyvictimization, and health in Swedish adolescents

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dc.contributor.author Aho, N., Proczkowska-Björklund, M., & Svedin, C. G.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-24T19:02:10Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-24T19:02:10Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Aho, N., Proczkowska-Björklund, M., & Svedin, C. G. (2016). Victimization, polyvictimization, and health in Swedish adolescents. Adolescent health, medicine and therapeutics, 7, 89-99. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5008259/pdf/ahmt-7-089.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3171
dc.description.abstract The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16-20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Adolescent health, medicine and therapeutics en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject International Resources en_US
dc.subject Sweden en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Victimization, polyvictimization, and health in Swedish adolescents en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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