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Emotional and Sexual Correlates of Child Sexual Abuse as a Function of Self-Definition Status

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dc.contributor.author Vaillancourt-Morel, M. P., Godbout, N., Bédard, M. G., Charest, É., Briere, J., & Sabourin, S.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-13T17:27:48Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-13T17:27:48Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Vaillancourt-Morel, M. P., Godbout, N., Bédard, M. G., Charest, É., Briere, J., & Sabourin, S. (2016). Emotional and sexual correlates of child sexual abuse as a function of self-definition status. Child maltreatment, 21(3), 228-238. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.natachagodbout.com/sites/default/files/publications/emotional_and_sexual_correlates_of_child_sexual_abuse_as_a_function_of_self-definition_status.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3112
dc.description.abstract Among individuals defined as having been sexually abused based on legal criteria, some will self-report having been abused and some will not. Yet, the empirical correlates of self-definition status are not well studied. Different definitions of abuse may lead to varying prevalence rates and contradictory findings regarding psychological outcomes. The present study examined whether, among legally defined sexual abuse survivors, identifying oneself as having experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) was associated with more severe abuse, negative emotional reactions toward the abuse, and current sexual reactions. A convenience sample of 1,021 French-speaking Canadians completed self-report questionnaires online. The prevalence of legally defined CSA was 21.3% in women and 19.6% in men, as compared to 7.1% in women and 3.8% in men for self-defined CSA. Among legally defined sexual abuse survivors, those who identified themselves as CSA survivors had been abused more frequently, were more likely to report a male aggressor, and more often described abuse by a parental figure than those who did not self-identify as abused. Further, self-defined CSA was associated with more negative postabuse reactions and sexual avoidance, whereas those not identifying as sexually abused were more likely to report sexual compulsion. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Child Maltreatment en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject sexual abuse en_US
dc.subject definitions en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.subject International Resources en_US
dc.subject Canada en_US
dc.title Emotional and Sexual Correlates of Child Sexual Abuse as a Function of Self-Definition Status en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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