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How parents suspected of child maltreatment change their cognition and behavior: A process model of outreach and child protection, generated via grounded theory

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dc.contributor.author Takaoka, K., Mizoguchi, F., Wada, I., Nakazato, M., Shiraishi, T., Ando, S., ... & Shimizu, E.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-07T16:26:23Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-07T16:26:23Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Takaoka, K., Mizoguchi, F., Wada, I., Nakazato, M., Shiraishi, T., Ando, S., ... & Shimizu, E. (2016). How parents suspected of child maltreatment change their cognition and behavior: A process model of outreach and child protection, generated via grounded theory. Children and Youth Services Review, 71, 257-265. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740916304340
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3085
dc.description.abstract Although considerable efforts have been made to improve relationships between professionals and parents suspected of child maltreatment, little research has been conducted to examine the ways in which parents escalate their negative cognition and behavior involving professionals. This study developed a model of parents' negative reinforcement of their cognitive behavior and the factors influencing reductions in this reinforcement. Interview data were collected from 21 parents, who had experienced outreach and child protection issues, and analyzed using the grounded theory approach. In the outreach phase, the analysis initially produced the negative image of help-seeking behavior category, followed by the dissatisfaction with outreach and reinforcement of negative cognition categories. In this phase, the analysis also identified the social support and support groups step as a means of reducing negative cognition. In contrast, in the child protection phase, the analysis produced the anger and psychological conflict with child protection services and unwilling consent categories. In this phase, the analysis also identified the psychoeducation and timely feedback step as an acceptable means of minimizing the escalation of negative cognition. The hypothetical model revealed the ways in which parents changed their cognition and behavior and demonstrated the factors influencing reductions in the reinforcement of negative cognition and behavior. These results could be useful for practice in child maltreatment cases. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Children and Youth Services Review en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.subject Japan en_US
dc.subject International Resources en_US
dc.subject child maltreatment en_US
dc.subject neglect en_US
dc.subject cognitive-behavioral therapy en_US
dc.subject child protection en_US
dc.subject grounded theory en_US
dc.subject client views en_US
dc.subject parents en_US
dc.title How parents suspected of child maltreatment change their cognition and behavior: A process model of outreach and child protection, generated via grounded theory en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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