CALiO Search

Child maltreatment victimization by type in relation to criminal recidivism in juvenile offenders

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author van der Put, C. E., & De Ruiter, C.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-14T15:58:59Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-14T15:58:59Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation van der Put, C. E., & De Ruiter, C. (2016). Child maltreatment victimization by type in relation to criminal recidivism in juvenile offenders. BMC psychiatry, 16(1), 9 p. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12888-016-0731-y?site=bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com  
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/3000
dc.description.abstract Background: This study aimed to examine the relation between different types of child abuse victimization and criminal recidivism among juvenile offenders. Method: Secondary analyses were conducted on data collected with the Washington State Juvenile Court Assessment and general recidivism. The sample consisted of female (n = 3502) and male (n = 10,111) juvenile offenders. Results: For male juvenile offenders, neglect and physical abuse victimization were significantly but rather weakly associated with both general and violent recidivism. For female juvenile offenders, neglect and physical abuse were weakly associated with general recidivism, but not with violent recidivism. Sexual abuse was not related to either general or violent recidivism in both male and female juvenile offenders. Most associations between dynamic (treatable) risk domains and recidivism were stronger in male juvenile offenders than in female juvenile offenders. In addition, most risk domains were more strongly related to general recidivism than to violent felony recidivism. For male juvenile offenders, neglect victimization was uniquely related to general recidivism whereas physical abuse victimization was uniquely related to violent recidivism, over and above dynamic risk factors for recidivism. For female juvenile offenders none of the maltreatment variables were uniquely related to general or violent felony recidivism. Conclusions: Childhood experiences of neglect and physical abuse predict reoffending in male juvenile offenders, pointing at a possible need to address these in risk management interventions. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BMC Psychiatry en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject sexual abuse en_US
dc.subject minors en_US
dc.subject perpetrators en_US
dc.subject recidivism en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Child maltreatment victimization by type in relation to criminal recidivism in juvenile offenders en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account