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Social cognition, child neglect, and child injury risk: the contribution of maternal social information processing to maladaptive injury prevention beliefs within a high-risk sample

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dc.contributor.author Azar, S. T., Miller, E. A., Stevenson, M. T., & Johnson, D. R.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-12T17:46:38Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-12T17:46:38Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Azar, S. T., Miller, E. A., Stevenson, M. T., & Johnson, D. R. (2016). Social cognition, child neglect, and child injury risk: the contribution of maternal social information processing to maladaptive injury prevention beliefs within a high-risk sample. Journal of pediatric psychology, jsw067. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Elizabeth_Miller35/publication/305783866_Social_Cognition_Child_Neglect_and_Child_Injury_Risk_The_Contribution_of_Maternal_Social_Information_Processing_to_Maladaptive_Injury_Prevention_Beliefs_Within_a_High-Risk_Sample/links/57a4de9708ae3f45292d24b4.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/2989
dc.description.abstract Objective: Inadequate supervision has been linked to children’s injuries. Parental injury prevention beliefs may play a role in supervision, yet little theory has examined the origins of such beliefs. This study examined whether mothers who perpetrated child neglect, who as a group provide inadequate supervision, have more maladaptive beliefs. Then, it tested a social information processing (SIP) model for explaining these beliefs. Methods: SIP and injury prevention beliefs were assessed in disadvantaged mothers of preschoolers (N  =  145), half with child neglect histories. Results: The neglect group exhibited significantly more maladaptive injury prevention beliefs than comparisons. As predicted, SIP was linked to beliefs that may increase injury risk, even after accounting for relevant sociodemographic variables. Conclusions: Findings support the link of beliefs to injury risk and suggest that specific cognitive problems may underlie these beliefs. Future work should further validate this model, which may inform enhancements to prevention efforts. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Journal of pediatric psychology en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject parenting en_US
dc.subject risk factors en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Social cognition, child neglect, and child injury risk: the contribution of maternal social information processing to maladaptive injury prevention beliefs within a high-risk sample en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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