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Prenatal methamphetamine exposure, home environment, and primary caregiver risk factors predict child behavioral problems at 5 years.

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dc.contributor.author Twomey, J., LaGasse, L., Derauf, C., Newman, E., Shah, R., Smith, L., ... & Dansereau, L.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-16T15:18:25Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-16T15:18:25Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Twomey, J., LaGasse, L., Derauf, C., Newman, E., Shah, R., Smith, L., ... & Dansereau, L. (2013). Prenatal methamphetamine exposure, home environment, and primary caregiver risk factors predict child behavioral problems at 5 years. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 83(1), 64-72 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3721329/
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/2790
dc.description.abstract This study investigated the prospective association between prenatal methamphetamine (MA) exposure and child behavioral problems at 5 years while also examining the home environment at 30 months and several primary caregiver (PC) risk factors. Participants were 97 MA-exposed and 117 comparison children and their PCs enrolled in the Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle Study. Hypotheses were that child behaviors would be adversely impacted by (a) prenatal MA exposure, (b) home environments that provided less developmental stimulation and emotional responsiveness to the child, and (c) the presence of PC psychological symptoms and other risk factors. Prenatal MA exposure was associated with child externalizing behavioral problems at 5 years. Home environments that were more conducive to meeting children’s developmental and emotional needs were associated with fewer internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems. Independent of prenatal MA exposure, PC parenting stress and psychological symptoms were associated with increased child behavioral problems. Findings suggest prenatal MA exposure may contribute to externalizing behavioral problems in early childhood and the importance of considering possible vulnerabilities related to prenatal MA exposure in the context of the child’s caregiving environment en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Journal of Orthopsychiatry en_US
dc.subject infants en_US
dc.subject pregnant women en_US
dc.subject children en_US
dc.subject methamphetamine use en_US
dc.subject prenatal substance exposure en_US
dc.subject primary caregiver en_US
dc.subject parenting stress en_US
dc.title Prenatal methamphetamine exposure, home environment, and primary caregiver risk factors predict child behavioral problems at 5 years. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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