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Weight-related abuse: Perceived emotional impact and the effect on disordered eating

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dc.contributor.author Salwen, J. K., Hymowitz, G. F., Bannon, S. M., & O’Leary, K. D.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-23T16:18:13Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-23T16:18:13Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Salwen, J. K., Hymowitz, G. F., Bannon, S. M., & O’Leary, K. D. (2015). Weight-related abuse: perceived emotional impact and the effect on disordered eating. Child abuse & neglect, 45, 163-171. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jessica_Salwen/publication/271602958_Weight-related_abuse_Perceived_emotional_impact_and_the_effect_on_disordered_eating/links/550096a90cf2d61f820eea9d.pdf  
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/2588
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this article was to evaluate theories that (1) weight-related abuse (WRA) plays a unique role in the development of disordered eating, above and beyond general childhood verbal abuse and weight-related teasing, and (2) the perceived emotional impact of WRA mediates the relationship between WRA and current disordered eating. Self-report questionnaires on childhood trauma, weight-related teasing, WRA, and current eating behaviors were administered to a total of 383 undergraduate students. In initial regressions, WRA significantly predicted binge eating, emotional eating, night eating, and unhealthy weight control. WRA continued to significantly predict all 4 forms of disordered eating following the introduction of measures of weight-related teasing and childhood verbal abuse into the regression. Latent variable analysis confirmed that perceived emotional impact of WRA mediated the relationship between WRA and disordered eating, and tests for indirect effects yielded a significant indirect effect of WRA on disordered eating through perceived emotional impact. In sum, WRA is a unique construct and the content of childhood or adolescent maltreatment is important in determining eventual psychopathology outcomes. These findings support the necessity of incorporating information on developmental history and cognitive factors into assessment and treatment of individuals with disordered eating. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Child Abuse & Neglect en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject bullying en_US
dc.subject obesity en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Weight-related abuse: Perceived emotional impact and the effect on disordered eating en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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