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S100B blood levels and childhood trauma in adolescent inpatients

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dc.contributor.author Falcone, T., Janigro, D., Lovell, R., Simon, B., Brown, C. A., Herrera, M., ... & Anand, A.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-22T17:51:35Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-22T17:51:35Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Falcone, T., Janigro, D., Lovell, R., Simon, B., Brown, C. A., Herrera, M., ... & Anand, A. (2015). S100B blood levels and childhood trauma in adolescent inpatients. Journal of psychiatric research, 62, 14-22. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4413930/pdf/nihms-679812.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/2350
dc.description.abstract Background: Serum levels of the astrocytic protein S100B have been reported to indicate disruption of the blood–brain barrier. In this study, we investigated the relationship between S100B levels and childhood trauma in a child psychiatric inpatient unit. Method: Levels of S100B were measured in a group of youth with mood disorders or psychosis with and without history of childhood trauma as well as in healthy controls. Study participants were 93 inpatient adolescents admitted with a diagnosis of psychosis (N = 67), or mood disorder (N = 26) and 22 healthy adolescents with no history of trauma or psychiatric illness. Childhood trauma was documented using the Life Events Checklist (LEC) and Adverse Child Experiences (ACE). Results: In a multivariate regression model, suicidality scores and trauma were the only two variables which were independently related to serum S100B levels. Patients with greater levels of childhood trauma had significantly higher S100B levels even after controlling for intensity of suicidal ideation. Patients with psychotic diagnoses and mood disorders did not significantly differ in their levels of S100B. Patients exposed to childhood trauma were significantly more likely to have elevated levels of S100B (p < .001) than patients without trauma, and patients with trauma had significantly higher S100B levels (p < .001) when compared to the control group. LEC (p 0.046), and BPRS-C suicidality scores (p = 0.001) significantly predicted S100B levels. Conclusions: Childhood trauma can potentially affect the integrity of the blood–brain barrier as indicated by associated increased S100B levels. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Journal of psychiatric research en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject inflamation en_US
dc.subject biomarkers en_US
dc.subject stress en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title S100B blood levels and childhood trauma in adolescent inpatients en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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