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Adverse childhood experiences and intimate partner aggression in the US: Sex differences and similarities in psychosocial mediation

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dc.contributor.author Brown, M. J., Perera, R. A., Masho, S. W., Mezuk, B., & Cohen, S. A.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-22T13:43:40Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-22T13:43:40Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Brown, M. J., Perera, R. A., Masho, S. W., Mezuk, B., & Cohen, S. A. (2015). Adverse childhood experiences and intimate partner aggression in the US: Sex differences and similarities in psychosocial mediation. Social Science & Medicine, 131, 48-57. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4479130/pdf/nihms698990.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/2347
dc.description.abstract Six in ten people in the general population have been exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major public health problem in the US. The main objective of this study was to assess sex differences in the role of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance abuse, and depression as mediators in the association between ACEs and intimate partner aggression. Data were obtained from Wave 2 (2004–2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Structural equation modeling was used to determine the mediational role of PTSD, substance abuse and depression in the association between ACE constructs (neglect, physical/psychological abuse, sexual abuse, parental violence, and parental incarceration/psychopathology) and intimate partner aggression. Among men, PTSD mediated the relationship between sexual abuse and intimate partner aggression. However, among men and women, substance abuse mediated the relationship between physical and psychological abuse and intimate partner aggression. IPV programs geared towards aggressors should address abuse (sexual, physical and psychological), which occurred during childhood and recent substance abuse and PTSD. These programs should be implemented for men and women. Programs aimed at preventing abuse of children may help to reduce rates of depression and PTSD in adulthood, and subsequent intimate partner aggression. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Social Science & Medicine en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject Intimate partner violence en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject prevention en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Adverse childhood experiences and intimate partner aggression in the US: Sex differences and similarities in psychosocial mediation en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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