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Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls

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dc.contributor.author American Psychological Association, Task Force on the Sexualization of girls
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-05T16:13:11Z
dc.date.available 2015-03-05T16:13:11Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation merican Psychological Association,Task Force on the Sexualization of girls (2008). Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.apa.org/pi/women/programs/girls/report-full.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/2201
dc.description.abstract There are many examples of the sexualization of girls and girlhood in U.S. culture.Toy manufacturers produce dolls wearing black leather miniskirts, feather boas, and thigh-high boots and market them to 8- to 12-year-old. Clothing stores sell thongs sized for 7– to 10-year-old girls, some printed with slogans such as “eye candy” or “wink wink”; other thongs sized for women and late adolescent girls are imprinted with characters from Dr. Seuss and the Muppet. In the world of child beauty pageants, 5-year-old girls wear fake teeth, hair extensions, and makeup and are encouraged to “flirt” onstage by batting their long, false eyelashes. On prime-time television, girls can watch fashion shows in which models made to resemble little girls wear sexy lingerie. Journalists, child advocacy organizations, parents, and psychologists have become alarmed, arguing that the sexualization of girls is a broad and increasing problem and is harmful to girls. The Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls was formed in response to these expressions of public concern. In this report,we examine and summarize psychological theory, research, and clinical experience addressing the sexualization of girls.We (a) define sexualization; (b) examine the prevalence and provide examples of sexualization in society and in cultural institutions, as well as interpersonally and intrapsychically; (c) evaluate the evidence suggesting that sexualization has negative consequences for girls and for the rest of society; and (d) describe positive alternatives that may help counteract the influence of sexualization. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Psychological Association en_US
dc.subject child sexual behavior en_US
dc.subject sexualized behavior en_US
dc.subject media en_US
dc.subject intervention en_US
dc.subject review en_US
dc.title Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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