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Reported History of Childhood Abuse and Young Adults’ Information Processing Biases for Facial Displays of Emotion

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dc.contributor.author Gibb, B. E., Schofield, C. A., & Coles, M. E.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-19T15:43:33Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-19T15:43:33Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Gibb, B. E., Schofield, C. A., & Coles, M. E. (2008). Reported history of childhood abuse and young adults' information processing biases for facial displays of emotion. Child maltreatment, 14(2), 148-156. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4077288/pdf/nihms-605144.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/1652
dc.description.abstract The primary goal of this study was to examine the relations between young adults’ reports of childhood abuse and their current attention and interpretation biases for facial displays of emotion. Consistent with prediction, individuals reporting a history of moderate to severe childhood abuse exhibited preferential attention to angry faces and increased sensitivity in the detection of angry expressions at lower levels of emotional intensity. Both the attention and interpretation biases were specific to angry rather than happy or sad faces. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that experiences of childhood abuse may contribute to the development of experience-specific information-processing biases. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Child Maltreatment en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.title Reported History of Childhood Abuse and Young Adults’ Information Processing Biases for Facial Displays of Emotion en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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