CALiO Search

Re-reporting of child maltreatment: Does participation in other public sector services moderate the likelihood of a second, maltreatment report?

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Drake, B., Jonson-Reid, M., & Sapokaite, L.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-19T15:29:29Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-19T15:29:29Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Drake, B., Jonson-Reid, M., & Sapokaite, L. (2006). Re-reporting of child maltreatment: Does participation in other public sector services moderate the likelihood of a second, maltreatment report? Child Abuse & Neglect, 30(11), 1201-1226. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562123/pdf/nihms14812.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/1651
dc.description.abstract This study uses administrative data to track the first re-reports of maltreatment in a low-income, urban child welfare population (n = 4,957) while controlling for other public service involvement. Service system involvement is explored across the following sectors: Child Welfare, Income Maintenance, Special Education, Juvenile Court, and various forms of Medicaid-reimbursed medical or mental health care. This study builds knowledge by adding the services dimension to an ecological framework for analyses and by following recurrence for a longer period of time than prior investigations (7.5 years). Method: We model the re-reporting of a child for maltreatment as a function of child, caregiver, service, and neighborhood characteristics using data from birth records, child welfare, income maintenance, Medicaid, adult corrections, juvenile court, special education, law enforcement, and census sources. Bivariate and multivariate analyses are presented, the latter using Cox regression with a robust sandwich covariance matrix estimate to account for the intra-cluster dependence within tracts. Results: Key results across bivariate and multivariate analyses included a lower rate of re-reporting among children with parents who were high school graduates and/or permanently exited from the first spell on AFDC (p <.0001); and for children in families that received less intensive in-home services compared to those not receiving services, receiving intensive in-home, or foster care services (p <.0001). Higher rates of re-reporting were found for children with Medicaid mental health/substance abuse treatment records (p <.0001) and special education eligibility for emotional disturbance (p <.005). Conclusions: Caretaker characteristics and non-child welfare service use patterns had a strong association with the likelihood of a child being re-reported to the child welfare agency and should be more heavily attended to by child welfare workers. High rates of service sector overlap suggest that inter-agency ties and cooperation should be strengthened. The lower risk associated with less intensive in-home services compared to un-served cases may indicate under-identification of in-home service eligibility following a first report of maltreatment. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Child Abuse & Neglect en_US
dc.subject child welfare en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject neglect en_US
dc.subject prevention en_US
dc.subject ecological model en_US
dc.subject intervention en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Re-reporting of child maltreatment: Does participation in other public sector services moderate the likelihood of a second, maltreatment report? en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account