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Identification of child maltreatment using prospective and self-report methodologies: A comparison of maltreatment incidence and relation to later psychopathology

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dc.contributor.author Shaffer, A., Huston, L., & Egeland, B.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-07T18:11:07Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-07T18:11:07Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Shaffer, A., Huston, L., & Egeland, B. (2008). Identification of child maltreatment using prospective and self-report methodologies: A comparison of maltreatment incidence and relation to later psychopathology. Child abuse & neglect, 32(7), 682-692. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2581900/pdf/nihms61433.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/1629
dc.description.abstract Objectives: One of the greatest methodological problems in the study of childhood maltreatment is the discrepancy in methods by which cases of child maltreatment are identified. The current study compared incidents of maltreatment identified prospectively, retrospectively, or through a combination of both methods. Method: Within a cohort of 170 participants followed from birth to age 19, incidents of maltreatment which occurred prior to age 17.5 were identified via prospective case review and interviewer ratings of retrospective self-reports. Multi-informant measures of behavior problems were obtained at age 16, and diagnostic assessments of psychopathology were completed at age 17.5. Results: While the maximal number of maltreatment cases was identified by using a combination of all available identification methods, the prospective method was the single most comprehensive method for identifying the most cases of childhood physical abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect. Those who were identified as maltreated by a combination of both prospective and self-report methods experienced the greatest number of incidences of maltreatment (i.e., 49% of this group experienced more than one type of maltreatment) and displayed the most emotional and behavioral problems in late adolescence (i.e., 74% met diagnostic criteria for a clinical disorder). Conclusions: This study emphasizes the variability in the incidence rates of maltreatment and the psychological outcomes that result from utilizing different methods of identification. The most severe cases of maltreatment are likely to be identified by both prospective and retrospective methods; however, cases that are identified solely through retrospective self-report may have unique relations to psychopathology in late adolescence. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Child Abuse & Neglect en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject child sexual abuse en_US
dc.subject neglect en_US
dc.subject physical abuse en_US
dc.subject disclosure en_US
dc.subject long term effects en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title Identification of child maltreatment using prospective and self-report methodologies: A comparison of maltreatment incidence and relation to later psychopathology en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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