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The Association between Maltreatment and Obesity among Preschool Children

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dc.contributor.author Whitaker, R. C., Phillips, S. M., Orzol, S. M., & Burdette, H. L.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-01T17:41:06Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-01T17:41:06Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation Whitaker, R. C., Phillips, S. M., Orzol, S. M., & Burdette, H. L. (2007). The association between maltreatment and obesity among preschool children. Child abuse & neglect, 31(11), 1187-1199. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2621258/pdf/nihms35448.pdf  
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11212/1607
dc.description.abstract Objective: To determine whether child maltreatment is associated with obesity in preschool children. Methods: Data were obtained from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a birth cohort study of 4898 children born between 1998 and 2000 in 20 large US cities. At 3 years of age, 2412 of these children had their height and weight measured, and mothers answered items on the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scales about three types of child maltreatment — neglect, corporal punishment, and psychological aggression. The frequency of each type of maltreatment behavior in the prior year was analyzed using categories — ever/never for neglect and quintiles for the other 2 types of maltreatment. Child obesity was defined as measured body mass index (kg/m2) ≥ 95th percentile. Results: Eighteen percent of the children were obese, and the prevalence of any episode of neglect, corporal punishment, and psychological aggression was 11%, 84%, and 93%, respectively. The odds of obesity were increased in children who had experienced neglect (odds ratio 1.56, 95% confidence interval, 1.14-2.14), after controlling for the income and number of children in the household, the mothers’ race/ethnicity, education, marital status, body mass index, prenatal smoking, and age, and the children’s sex and birth weight. Neither the frequency of corporal punishment nor psychological aggression was associated with an increased risk of obesity. Conclusions: In a sample of preschool children from 20 large US cities, maternal self-report of neglectful behavior was associated with an increased risk of childhood obesity, after controlling for birth weight, maternal obesity, and multiple socioeconomic factors. (Author Abstract) en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Child Abuse & Neglect en_US
dc.subject child abuse en_US
dc.subject neglect en_US
dc.subject corporal punishment en_US
dc.subject emotional abuse en_US
dc.subject BMI en_US
dc.subject weight en_US
dc.subject research en_US
dc.title The Association between Maltreatment and Obesity among Preschool Children en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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